Gay & Lesbian Films/TV On Netflix For Your Easter Break

Credits: Netflix

Credits: Netflix

Easter Vacation is about more than just revision. It’s about relaxing, enjoying a gentler pace of life beyond the frantic nature of life in Cambridge. Especially if you’re at home, already bored of your family’s company. For your entertainment, we’ve compiled a list of lesbian and gay films and TV programmes available on Netflix and tried to keep it a bit different to the usual lists of ‘Blue is the Warmest Colour’ and ‘Boys Don’t Cry’.

  • Get Real (tw. homophobic language)
Credits: Get Real.

Credits: Get Real.

Rural town model student Steven Carter (Ben Silverstone) hides his sexuality, except with his neighbor, Linda (Charlotte Brittain). Suddenly his cruising leads to a blind date with golden boy John Dixon (Brad Gorton), a popular sportsman. Steven finds the courage to approach John by volunteering for the school paper as sports photographer. An affair follows, but John is terrified of losing his social status. As the boys’ love blossoms, so grows despair about secrecy or outing consequences. Click to watch on Netflix.

  • Kill Your Darlings (tw. sexual content, language, drug use and brief violence)
Credits: Kill Your Darlings

Credits: Kill Your Darlings

With Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg, ‘Kill Your Darlings’ is a vibrant evocation of the beginning of the ‘Beat’ movement, in late 1940s New York City–and beyond. It is not only a story of Ginsberg and Lucien Carr’s (Dane Dehaan) relationship, featuring other Beats including Burroughs and Kerouac but also about murder and the confines of academia. Click to watch on Netflix.

  • The Hours (tw. suicide, some disturbing images and brief language)
Credits: The Hours

Credits: The Hours

‘The Hours’ is the story of three women of from three very different backgrounds whose lives are interconnected by Virginia Woolf’s ‘Mrs Dalloway’. Meryl Streep is Clarissa Vaughan, who is preparing a party for her long-time friend and poet, Richard (Ed Harris), who has AIDS, in 2001; Julianne Moore is Laura Brown, a pregnant 1950s housewife with a young son and an unhappy marriage; and Nicole Kidman plays Woolf in the 1920s, who is struggling with depression and mental illness while trying to write her novel. Click to watch on Netflix.

  • Call Me Kuchu (tw. murder, homophobia, strong homophobic language)
Credits: Call Me Kuchu

Credits: Call Me Kuchu

This new documentary follows David Kato, the first openly homosexual man in Uganda, as he and fellow activists fight the nation’s looming homophobic legislation while combating vicious persecution in their daily lives. David fights Uganda’s government and tabloids in the courts, on television, and at the United Nations. Because, he insists, “if we keep on hiding, they will say we’re not here.” Click to watch on Netflix.

  • Lilting (tw. mentions of car accident, death)
Credits: Lilting

Credits: Lilting

In London, a Cambodian-Chinese mother, Junn (Pei-pei Cheng) mourns the untimely death of her son. She reaches out to his ‘roommate’, Richard (Ben Whishaw) in an attempt to fully grieve, although she is unable to speak English and he is unable to speak any of the six languages she speaks. A delicate, deeply moving film that meditates on aging, bereavement, prejudice, social dislocation and language barriers. Click to watch on Netflix.

  • Paris is Burning (tw. mentions of murder)
paris_feature2_watermark

Credits: Paris Is Burning

 

A chronicle of New York’s drag scene in the 1980s, focusing on the ball culture of New York City and the African-American, Latino, gay, and transgender communities involved in it. A seminal documentary during the ‘golden era’ of New York City drag balls, it is also an important exploration of the intersections of sexuality, gender identity, race and class. Click to watch on YouTube.

  • Angels of Sex
Credits: Sex of the Angels

Credits: Sex of the Angels

Bruno (Llorenç González), a struggling student, loves his girlfriend Carla (Àstrid Bergès-Frisbey) but discovers a new side to himself when he meets a street dancer named Rai (Álvaro Cervantes). An interesting navigation of sexual fluidity, open relationships and the difficulties therein. Click to watch on Netflix.

  • Queer as Folk/The L Word (tw. explicit sex scenes, drug abuse, smoking, homophobic language, drinking, drug use)
Credits: The L Word

Credits: The L Word

Seminal classics. Hackneyed at times, yes, but the basis of so many LGBT+ programming afterwards, but still fun watching — especially if you’re sitting prelims and are going to be free to carry on binging after Week 0. Even if you don’t have Prelims, you can still commit anyway! The L word here and Queer as Folk here.

  • Orange is the New Black (tw. sexual assault, drug abuse, explicit sex scenes, sexist and homophobic language)
Credits: Orange is the New Black

Credits: Orange is the New Black

Just incase you missed it? If you haven’t been living under a rock, enjoy a rewatch before the new series is released on 12th June – just in time for May Week! Click here to watch on Netflix.

  • BONUS: But I’m a Cheerleader (US Netflix) (tw. conversion therapy, explicit sex scenes)
Credits: But I'm a Cheerleader

Credits: But I’m a Cheerleader

Natasha Lyonne, OITNB’s Nicky, is Megan, a high school cheerleader whose parents send her to a residential inpatient conversion therapy camp to cure her lesbianism. Sounds dark, but its as touching as it is funny, as well as an interesting deconstruction of heteronormativity and gender roles. You’ve got to find that one out yourself!

Mimi Trevelyan-Davis (GR. Culture Editor)

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2 thoughts on “Gay & Lesbian Films/TV On Netflix For Your Easter Break

  1. Trigger warnings for everything.. How do you people go outside without freaking out into a mental breakdown? Obviously this would be written by some moron at Cambridge that knows nothing of actual stress, or anguish. Someone that has been more than likely put through private school by their rich parents.

    You are so oppressed that you had to make a ‘LGBTQSGUEHFURBANANA++++++’ Film list? If a straight person did that it would be considered ‘oppression’. I suppose I should at this point, check my privilege?

    Do something productive.

    Like

  2. Thanks for the good writeup. It if truth be told was
    a entertainment account it. Glance complicated to more delivered agreeable
    from you! However, how could we be in contact?

    Like

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